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The Anomalist


August 22

Morton Hero Dad The Gazette UK
Dominic Boag lost one sense--his sight--and gained another, it seems. He says he can receive messages from the dead, including from his own father who he says "shouted" at him from the other side and convinced him he really was getting messages from people who had passed on. As a fully accredited medium, he says he's not here to try and convince anyone of anything, he just wants to help those who ask, on either side of life. Meanwhile, a Five Thirty-Eight writer says, I went to a psychic and then found out how right she really was by combining a tarot card reading's results with cold, hard statistics and facts.

We knew it wouldn't take long for the Koko the Gorilla mourning the death of Robin Williams to produce endless amounts of backlash because talking apes like Koko are actually considered less of a miracle and a gift to mankind and more of an obscene sideshow attraction that happens to have the entire world as its audience and scientific research as its stage. The results of experiments with gorillas like Koko the talking Gorilla, Kanzi the Bononbo, and Nim Chimpske the chimpanzee have generated massive amounts of doubt and scorn, almost as much wonder and amazement as their attempts at mastering human communication. Talking apes are certainly an oddity in the animal world, but an equally as odd specimen are the mysterious river sharks of the world. Didn't know that some sharks lurk in the shallow waters of local waters? Oh, but they do, and they are usually pretty grumpy about it too. At least they don't know sign language yet.

Here's yet another interview with Sara Seager from MIT who is convinced that we will soon discover intelligent life on other planets and will experience the "Awakening," as she calls it. She also explains the requirements that are needed in a precise mix to produce life on a barren planet and says while it does seem more than a little impossible for a series of random events could come together to create life, it is actually a fairly common occurrence due to the sheer size of our universe. If Seager were to look up into the night sky away from the telescope, she's likely to see a lot of strange things that might just be proof our galactic vistors are already here. In recent days, there are the Long Island Orbs that are being reported across New York, a flying disc that morphed into a banana shape as it swerved over Powys, Wales and a multi-colored glowing UFO over Ocean Isle, North Carolina.

August 21

Emmert's Law is the official term for "seeing things out of the corner of your eye" and seeing shadows turn into moving, seemingly living figures when the light's too dim to make out details. In other words, Emmert's Law is a technical explanation when the brain trolls itself. However, although that explains a certain percentage of paranormal experiences, it definitely doesn't cover the entire spectrum which is why a lot of people believe ghosts do exist based on their own experiences. This Awesome Map Shows The States Where Most People Believe In The Supernatural, and the results are somewhat surprising to us with the some southern states being at the bottom of list. Having some idea of the sheer number of southern-bred ghost tales we grew up on, some of us find this more inexplicable than actual ghosts.

This collection of statements from scientists from Max Planck to Henry Stapp range from the notion that human consciousness should at least be noted to the idea that the mind and brain are independent of each other and deserves further study on many different levels...And on a whole different level, recent studies Suggests Autistic Savants May Have Enhanced Telepathic Abilities. Their incredible and uncanny abilities to compute numbers or recall facts is apparently just the "tip of the iceberg" and what lies beneath is far more complex and almost beyond our understanding. Sometimes, the human mind takes a wrong turn or two and ends up in a bad place, which manifests itself as mental illness. In one culture in particular, Supernatural 'Jinn' Seen as Cause of Mental Illness Among Muslims. Mood disorders, epilepsy, OCD are among the mental issues that are believed by some to be triggered by the presence of supernatural beings and these beliefs have persisted down through centuries.

August 20

Apparently, this thing was so huge and bright that if you were in the area and outside, there was no way you missed the show. Described as the "size of the moon", this fireball lit up the sky over Vancouver for hundreds of miles Monday night and some are wondering if it might have been a remnant of the Perseid meteor shower from last week. The video doesn't show this meteor but it does show some spectacular images of past meteor sightings. There was also a similar sighting around the same time in New Zealand, where experts also reported that the Sky "explosion" likely a meteor. Residents of the North-Central Province in Sri Lanka also reported a strange light shooting through the sky and according to some reports, possibly crashing to earth. At what point do occurrences like this cease to be mere coincidence and turn into something we should maybe be a little concerned about? Are meteor sightings really increasing at an alarming rate or is the constant stream of interconnected social media and news that connects us all responsible for the illusion of an increase of reports?

It appears that the Houston UFO sighting that everyone's buzzing about has an extremely simple explanation. Daily Grail enlightens us to the solution and also sorts through some of the social media confusion that makes the sighting seem a lot more impressive than it actually was...That's one UFO debunked, but here's another one that's a lot less easy to explain. This Canadian UFO May Be a Meteor But Second Object Unidentified. Bug or extraterrestrial craft from another world?

The Daily Telegraph is getting a headstart on the usual early Halloween related news by sharing a collection of spooky destinations around the world that actually has a few unusual locations we've never even heard of. Well worth a glance--The deserted ghost town of Humberstone, Chile not only looks creepy but also apocalyptic as well. If you're in the mood for a much more scholarly approach to the paranormal today, here's a very indepth and through look at the Paranormal is (Still) Normal: The Sociological Implications of a Survey of Paranormal Experiences in Great Britain, which delivers a lot of hard, cold facts and statistics about the most ephemeral and ethereal of all subjects. Then there's this controversial discussion over on disinfo about the feud between TEDx speakers, Rupert Sheldrake and Graham Hancock and the so-dubbed "Anonymous Society of Scientists (ASS for short)", that's made up of unhappy TED scientists who had the two ousted over their controversial theories about human conscisousness: The Secret Science Boards of TED And The Question of Consciousness.

August 19

The most hated upon paranormal investigator show has been revived and The Guardian isn't impressed. At all. Most Haunted is the UK's version to the US' Ghost Adventures but without the humor, the natural inquisitiveness, the charm, or most importantly the ability to poke fun at themselves. The Guardian suggests that real ghosts aren't keen on making an appearance for Yvette Fielding and company because of all "the negative energy given off by half a dozen faintly embarrassed cameramen stuck between the realms of not wanting to look a complete wally and contractual obligations" and the "odd celebrity looking faintly embarrassed in a cold room going, 'that's really creaky, yeah.'" This review is about 10 times more entertaining than the show itself! And here's a spooky public service announcement for you--just in case you weren't aware, August is officially "Ghost Month" in China. August is apparently the vacation season for Hell which some believe opens its gates and lets out a steady stream of evil spirits for 30 days to torment the living. Just in case you run into ghostly trouble, here's 5 Things You Should Know About 'Ghost Month': The Do's and Donts.

While this video captured during an investigation by JUMP (Jersey Unique Minds Paranormal Society) isn't all that impressive in itself, the sheer amount of ghost sightings at this Elk Lodge in New Jersey really ups the belief factor. Not only has one ghost been sighted, but multiple moving shadows and figures all at once have been been seen in the Lodge's bar area. The investigators captured video, photographic and EVP evidence at Penn Grove's Elks Lodge and it seems pretty evident that the place is hopping with ghostly patrons bellying up to the bar. Meanwhile, a little known urban legend GHOSTS OR ALIENS?: Lost Villages home to Canada's first paranormal tale in the small town of Lost Villages may be the first ghost story (or alien invasion, depending on which version you find) ever recorded in Canada. It involves "dancing lights" and frightened old ladies way back in 1845.

Contrary to popular belief, stuff does happen in Canada...sometimes. For instance, there's been apporximately 14,600 UFO sighting reports there since 1989, according to UFOlogy Research. Of these, a staggering 49% were deemed to be probable UFOs. Meanwhile, Regional Businessman Photographs UFO During World Cup Games in Chile. It's becoming increasingly apparent that UFOs are either avid sports fans or have an excellent PR team that knows the value of appearing over a packed stadium.

August 18

NASA Mum On ISS UFO! Herald Tribune
Billy Cox attempted to contact ISS ground-support for a response about that now very famous ISS UFO video that has spread like wildfire through mainstream media the past few days. Not surprisingly, there's been no reply and no public statement from NASA informing us that what Scott Waring caught on video was ice crystals or "space junk", which is the 21st century substitute for "weather balloon". NASA usually does make a statement about unusual finds like this--they were pretty quick to explain those mysterious flashes of light on the surface of Mars captured by Curiosity a few months ago. Likewise, they were quick to debunk that strange "donut rock" that was photographed right in front of the Curiosity's tire. But this? They aren't saying a thing. Yet. If and when they do give an explanation, how will they explain away the fact that the video feed coincidentally cut out immediately afterward? We smell a cover-up...and oddly, donuts. Waring also has a pretty good roundup of reports, videos and photos of that Mass UFO sighting over Houston, Texas. Meanwhile, Inexplicata continues its look into humanoid UFO encounters with this unsettling tale of Phantom Humanoids in the Cordillera. In 1981, a sheep-herder reported watching a UFO hover nearby and then two humanoid figures appear "at his feet" as he lay down to sleep. They mumbled something in an unknown language and then disappeared. Not long after their ship flew away. The man says his fellow sheep-herder saw it too but the second witness never made his version of events public. This sounds less like a close encounter with aliens than it does a classic and unusually vivid incidence of sleep paralysis.

New Photograph of Nessie Loch Ness Mystery
Or is it a bird? Or a tree branch? It's great to have another possible bit of evidence to ponder, but it would be helpful to see the rest of the video aside from this 30-second shot. This is a recurring problem with anomalous videos of all sorts, from UFOs to Bigfoot. And speaking of Nessie, New Zealand Herald asks, Did King Kong inspire the myth of the Loch Ness monster? Presumably, they are referring to the original 1933 epic and not the laughably and almost painfully bad 1970's version which might have inspired some dangerous drinking games but not Nessie. Actually, we find the theory more than a little unbelievable since Nessie and other lake monsters were sighted before the first widely known sightings in 1933.

Something terrorized Gevaudan, France, for 6 years up until 1769 and was described as a sort of hybrid dog-wolf with 43 teeth. It killed by ripping throats out and almost 100 people were rumored to have died after being attacked by the beast. After a huge, monstrous wolf was shot and killed, the slaughter continued, and seemingly to appease the public, someone came up with the story of shooting and killing a second beast, this time with a silver bullet, which apparently stopped the massacres. So was it actually a werewolf by the technical definition? It's very doubtful and more likely it was a feral dog/wolf hybrid, but the Beast of Gevaudan and his silver bullets went down in history as a werewolf and spawned many versions of himself in the centuries afterward. Continuing the dog imposter trend this week, comes this unsuspecting dog that has solved the Norwalk Mountain Lion Mystery in California. Buddy the dog's owners say it's clearly their pet captured on video in their neighborhood and not a renegade mountain lion fresh out of the mountains thirsting for suburban victims.

August 17

Either Ray Bradbury's Sound Of Thunder was sheer speculation, or this is a rare instance where modern anomalists could be wrong. A cranium was unearthed back in 1922 evincing an apparent bullet wound over the left ear. It's not the first instance of purported, ancient firearms, writes Mike Hallowell, as a gigantic auroch's skull bears a similar wound. More crazy theories, with a smattering of science, can be found at Who Forted? wondering if A Caveman Was Killed By A Chrononaut. We do recommend consulting with serious historians, like Dr. Beachcombing, who finds synergy with Catholics, Dead Sheep, And Fireballs In Early Modern England. As the English Reformation engaged in earnest, a curious tale of some dead sheep has Beach playing with history and conspiracy amongst Catholics to thwart this ideological divorce.

Lon Strickler isn't tripping on DMT here, gang. P&M, as the cool kids call it, remains a valuable resource for high strangeness, and tales of gigantic mantids engaging humans remain peerless in the fortean world. Accounts of mantids and UFOs from desolate Nevada, video footage from Asia, and telepathy with puny humans are part of this nutritious breakfast. But why giant bugs all of a sudden? A few days ago, Lon received word of a Possible 3rd Mantis Man Sighting from New Jersey. This specimen appears to have the ability to partially cloak itself, with numerous eyewitness reports dating from 2011 along the banks of the Muscenetcong river.

Since the slides aren't going to see daylight anytime soon, we're stuck with speculation. The most delicious speculation comes from Rich Reynolds, proposing a theory that's eerily plausible. Let's just say the Nazis got their last licks around 1946 on American soil, and the slides might be evidence of the mishap from White Sands Proving Grounds. If slaughtering sacred cows is your pastime, Kevin Randle is having a grand old time tackling the chestnut of Astronomers And Alien Spacecraft. If the official documents are to be believed, maybe Neil deGrasse Tyson is the only astronomer who hasn't had the pleasure of spying our star siblings. Finally, Billy Cox is Back For An Encore, by popular demand, weighing the good and the bad of MUFON's media attention from its Hangar 1 series. Surprise, it's mostly bad and Billy crankily tabulates the cloud around this meager silver lining.

The Spectral Moose Of Maine Mysterious Universe
No one may be surprised there's a moose in Maine, but a ghostly white specimen standing 10-15 feet tall? Not to mention their eerie, supernatural talents lending a bit more weight to Nick Redfern's theory of cryptids winking in and out of dimensions. Brent Swancer does Nick one better, celebrating past sightings while pointing out contemporary encounters, making a strong case for the beast's existence. If you ever doubted the fundamental weirdness of fortean zoology, look no further than Karl Shuker. He has a blast from the past, courtesy of the late, lamented Strange Magazine referencing A Novel Instance Of Red Eye-Glow Potentially Relevant To Cryptozoology And Also To The Paranormal. Folks sharing their homes with four-legged friends knows their eyes shine bright green at night, but Karl points out instances, and causes, of red eye in critters. Seems if one sees a black dog upon the moors, most likely the poor horror can't see you.

We can only imagine the big ol' grin on Carlos Alvarado's face as he interviewed Russell Targ, champion of psi research. It's our chance to be a fly on the wall, or remote viewing the pair, as Targ discusses his interest in science fiction, the nature of consciousness, and how scientists embrace silliness like String Theory which has less supporting evidence than psi.


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